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Plastic surgeons ask if selfie editing is associated with the desire for plastic surgery



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New data collected by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine are accumulating what we already know the relationship between the use of social media and the increased desire for plastic surgery. But this is the first study to measure the relationship between the use of photo editing software and filters for social media and the treatment of these procedures.

Leading author of the study, Lisa E. Ishii, MD, sought to assess whether respect for the use of self-governance and the use of photo editing applications in social networks is related to the treatment of cosmetic surgery. In the end, the annual study of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in 2017 showed that 55% of surgeons reported on the visits of patients who requested an operation to improve their appearance in selfies.

But if selfies are technically pictures … well, by yourself, how would you like to look more how are they

At the end of last year, we met with the phrase "Snapchat dysmorphia" in a piece Researchers at the Department of Dermatology at the School of Medicine at Boston University. IN Plastic Surgery Faces, they described the ability of the Snapchat and FaceTune filters to smooth the skin and make the teeth look whiter, and the lips look more complete like a gate to see themselves altogether in a new way – the way users wanted to repeat in real life.

Although nobody goes to the offices of cosmetic surgeons asking for the puppies' ear (still), the doctor. Nealam Yours, co-author and director of the Center for Ethnic Skin at Boston University, suggested that such programs could focus on the user's disadvantages. And the obsession with eliminating these "disadvantages" – along with the desire to see in the mirror what is seen on a filtered photo – leads more and more young women to look for plastic surgeons.

In fact, the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery said that 55% of clinicians reported that their patients "wanted to look better in their selfies" in 2017 – compared with 42% in the previous year. Patients are also younger – 72% of the facial plastic surgeons reported increasing cosmetic surgery or other treatments in patients under the age of 30.

Your doctor told the site Inverse that these photo editing programs give an idea of ​​perfection, which is difficult to persecute, explaining that "it becomes a trigger for people who are very busy with what they look like."

We have a long time It is perfectly symmetrical with beauty – even the hypothesis that there is symmetry evolutionary health indicator and the ability to seduce (all of this, at least, is still for discussion). Facial aSymmetry is one of the things that these filters outperform in "correction". And your doctor said that her own patients came up with a request for procedures that would change the proportion of the person that This was reported by Emma Beuttel "Similar to what you can see on a butterfly filter or crochet filters" on Snapchat.

Just a few months ago, Dr. Patrick Byrne, Director of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Faces in John Hopkins Medicine, said CBS News that his younger patients will not be able to keep a mirror to their faces and describe what they wanted to "fix". Instead, they will pull out their phones and find their best photos as links.

What he called "a bit crazy" is evidence of how digital photography has dominated over how we think about ourselves. And while some plastic surgeons are selling "Rejuvenation" procedures aimed at supporting young people, rather than reversing signs of aging (collecting millions of dollars with the promise of eternal beauty and guaranteeing that it is It's never too early for botox), others turn away the patients which are too young to have one wrinkle – after all, you can not smooth something that does not exist.

However, our obsession with our digital "I" is not in our heads. Levels and employers have access to these images and give them meaning. We are deceiving ourselves if we pretend that there is no pressure or value to look for the best image that can potentially be online forever.

The team of Dr. Ishii, who just published his research in Plastic Surgery Faces, asked 252 adult English speakers in the US (most of whom were white women, important to note) to answer some questions about using social media and photo editing tools as well as their attitude to cosmetic surgery.

They were asked to inform themselves on how much time they spent on the different platforms they used, the types of software or filters they used to edit their photos that they posted on the Internet, and how many of their photos were published. and how much of them was strengthened. Subjects also reported how long they were changing photos before they were posted, and whether they had ever been tagged or deleted a photo because it was "not digitally expanded or edited to your liking."

The self-assessment of the participants was assessed using two general psychological questionnaires, and they were asked if they would consider the question of cosmetic surgery, as well as what their motives would be for the conduct of the procedures. The statistical analysis of all these data showed some interesting results that deserve further discussion – and, of course, further research.

First, participants who used more social media programs were more likely to be surgically intercepted – but it's nothing new. Although 65.87% of participants reported using photo editing software to make changes to photo lighting, only 5.16% reported using them to make changes to the body or face shape.

Although behaviors such as the removal of photographs that were not improved, or the use of Instagram filters or VSCO photo editing programs, have been associated with an increased focus on cosmetic surgery, statistical analysis has not been found. significant Interaction between photo editing and plastic surgery.

Of course, the researchers were able to repeat some other conclusions: engaging in social media may worsen the anxiety of the body image due to the ability to constantly compare themselves with peers – but unexpected results (that is, without finding statistically significant correlations) mean what else needs to be done to explain the meaning of & # 39; between social media photo editing and the desire for plastic surgery.

Part of the problem is that a wide range of photo editing was considered. There is a big difference between making lighting changes and faces FaceTune to oblivion. Researchers note that while photographic editing functions to change lighting did not have a significant association with cosmetic surgery positions, "the use of photo editing features to change facial features was associated with an increased focus on surgery."

But in general, they could not make enough convincing cases of the data collected. And it's important to publish these studies. This does not mean that there is nothing, only that the experiment created with these parameters did not give a convincing correlation.

This means that the other team should consider more specific ways of using digital manipulation and its relation to plastic surgery. We know that something happens to women under the age of 30, but we need to look more closely at how many people change their faces and bodies in photos, and whether or not they are more likely to make changes to the IRL. "

Meanwhile, it's worth it keep talking about the motivation of plastic surgery – and the plastic surgeons themselves should be the ones who guide their young patients to keep their expectations realistic.

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New data collected by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine consists of the fact that we already know about the links between the use of social media and the increased desire for plastic surgery. But this is the first study to measure the relationship between the use of photo editing software and filters for social media and the treatment of these procedures.

Leading author of the study, Lisa E. Ishii, MD, sought to assess whether respect for the use of self-governance and the use of photo editing applications in social networks is related to the treatment of cosmetic surgery. In the end, the annual study of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in 2017 showed that 55% of surgeons reported that they saw patients who sought surgery to improve their appearance in selfies.

But if selfies are technically pictures … well, by yourself, how would you like to look more how are they

At the end of last year, we met with the phrase "Snapchat dysmorphia" in the work of researchers at the Department of Dermatology at the School of Medicine at Boston University.. IN Plastic Surgery Facesthey described the ability of the Snapchat and FaceTune filters to smooth the skin and make the teeth look whiter, and the lips look more complete like a gateway to see themselves in a completely new way – the way users wanted to repeat in real life.

Although no one goes to the offices of cosmetic surgeons asking for puppies' ear (still), Dr. Nilam Vashi, co-author and director of the Center for Ethnic Skin Boston University, suggested that such programs may focus on the user's attention to their perceived disadvantages. And the obsession with eliminating these "disadvantages" – along with the desire to see in the mirror what is seen on a filtered photo – leads more and more young women to look for plastic surgeons.

In fact, the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery said that 55% of clinicians reported that their patients "wanted to look better in their selfies" in 2017 – compared with 42% in the previous year. Patients are also younger – 72% of the facial plastic surgeons reported increasing cosmetic surgery or other treatments in patients under the age of 30.

Your doctor told the Inverse website that these photo editing apps give you an idea of ​​perfection that is hard to persecute, explaining that "it's a trigger for people who are really busy with what they look like."

We have long dreamed of perfect symmetry with beauty – even the hypothesis that symmetry is an evolutionary indicator of health and temptation (which is at least still the subject of discussion). Facial aSymmetry is one of the things that these filters outperform in "correction". And your doctor said that her own patients had come up with a request for procedures that would change the aspect ratio of what Emma Beuttel, Inverse says, "is similar to what you might see in the butterfly filter or the Flower Crown filter on Snapchat

Just a few months ago, Dr. Patrick Byrne, director of plastic surgery and reconstructive surgery in John Hopkins's medicine, told CBS News that his younger patients would not be able to hold the mirror to their faces and describe what they wanted to "fix." Instead, they took their phones and found the best photo as a link.

What he called "a bit crazy" is evidence of how digital photography has dominated over how we think about ourselves. And while some plastic surgeons sell "rejuvenation" procedures to support young people, rather than the reversal of the signs of aging (rubbing millions of dollars, promising eternal beauty and confidence that Botox will never be early), others turn away patients who are too young to have one wrinkle – after all, you can not smooth something that is not.

However, our obsession with our digital "I" is not in our heads. Levels and employers have access to and benefit from these images. We are deceiving ourselves if we pretend that there is no pressure or value to look for the best image that can potentially be online forever.

The team of Dr. Ishii, who published his research in Russia Plastic Surgery Faces, asked 252 adult English speakers in the US (most of whom were white women, important to note) to answer some questions about using social media and photo editing tools as well as their attitude to cosmetic surgery.

They were asked to inform themselves on how much time they spent on the different platforms they used, the types of software or filters they used to edit their photos that they posted on the Internet, and how many of their photos were published. and how much of them was strengthened. Subjects also reported how long they were changing photos before they were posted, and whether they had ever been tagged or deleted a photo because it was "not digitally expanded or edited to your liking."

The self-assessment of the participants was assessed using two general psychological questionnaires, and they were asked if they would consider the question of cosmetic surgery, as well as what their motives would be for the conduct of the procedures. The statistical analysis of all these data showed some interesting results that deserve further discussion – and, of course, further research.

First, participants who used more social media programs were likely to be more inclined to surgery – but this is nothing new. Although 65.87% of participants reported using photo editing software to make changes to photo lighting, only 5.16% reported using them to make changes to the body or face shape.

Although behaviors such as the removal of photographs that were not improved, or the use of Instagram filters or VSCO photo editing programs, have been associated with an increased focus on cosmetic surgery, statistical analysis has not been found. significant Interaction between photo editing and plastic surgery.

Of course, researchers were able to repeat some other conclusions – the involvement of social media may worsen the caring of the body image through the ability to constantly compare themselves with peers – but unexpected results (that is, without showing statistically significant correlation) mean that more work has to be done to explain the meaning of 39 between social media photo editing and the desire for plastic surgery.

Part of the problem is that a wide range of photo editing was considered. There is a big difference between making lighting changes and faces FaceTune to oblivion. Researchers note that while photographic editing functions to change lighting did not have a significant association with cosmetic surgery positions, "the use of photo editing features to change facial features was associated with an increased focus on surgery."

But in general, they could not make enough convincing cases of the data collected. And it's important to publish these studies. This does not mean that there is nothing, only that the experiment created with these parameters did not give a convincing correlation.

This means that the other team should consider more specific ways of using digital manipulation and its relation to plastic surgery. We know that something happens to women under the age of 30, but we need to look more closely at how many people change their faces and bodies in photos, and whether or not they are more likely to make changes to the IRL. "

At the same time, it is worth continuing the conversation about the motivation of plastic surgery – and the plastic surgeons themselves should be the ones who guide their young patients to keep their expectations realistic.

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