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Updated guidelines for HPV vaccine



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Updated guidelines for HPV vaccine

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In this archival snapshot, on August 28, 2006, the doctor is holding a human vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) in Gardasil at his Chicago office. (AP Photo / Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

POV YAZANA PRESS

Adults up to 45 years of age are advised to talk to their doctor about a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine that prevents 3% of all cancers in women and 2% of all cancers in men. About 34,000 cases of cancer per year in the United States. After confirmation from the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the recommendations also apply to the age of men aged 21 to 26 years, as well as to women.

The decision of the Advisory Committee of the CDC on Practice of Immunization (ACIP) on July 26 came that day Lancet Published the most current research on vaccine efficacy. A meta-analysis of 65 studies found a drop from 31% to 83% of HPV infections and genital warts in men and women, depending on age and diagnosis.

HPV is responsible for almost all cases of cervical cancer, over 90% of anal cancer, 70% of cases of cancers, throat and neck, and more than 60% of penile cancers. Although HPV is mainly transmitted through sexual contact, non-sexual transmission is also taking place.

Previously, an HPV vaccine was recommended for women and men in a series of two doses of up to 14 years, or three doses of up to 26 years for women and 21 years for men. Men between the ages of 22 and 26 can also be vaccinated.

ACIP's unanimous vote for the 26-year recommendation for men suggests significant benefits to men. In fact, studies have shown that males develop six times more often than women with high-risk strains of HPV.

ACIP's 10 to 4 votes for adults aged 27 to 45 who have not received a vaccine against IDPs, insist on joint decision-making with their suppliers. The HPV vaccine is not approved by the FDA for adults over the age of 45 years, because efficacy data do not exist for this age group.

"ACIP's decision indicates that the data showed that the HPV vaccine is safe and effective in patients aged 27 to 45 years and that its use in this age group should be the result of" Joint decision-making between patients and their trusted doctors "said Christopher M. Zan, MD, vice president of practical work at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

"Gynecologists-obstetricians are invited to discuss with their patients from 27 to 45 years the potential benefits of HPV vaccination aimed at reducing the effectiveness of vaccination in the younger age group, as well as reducing the risk of a full-fledged disease and cervical cancer," said Zan, adding that Receiving a vaccine at the recommended age of 11-12 years is of greatest use.

Women's decisions will also take into account their personal circumstances, preferences and concerns, and the role of obstetrician-gynecologist is to provide impartial, balanced and comprehensive information to facilitate decision-making. He said.

New studies show a significant reduction in HPV-related infections

A new study showed that HPV infections in strains 16 and 18 decreased by 83% in girls aged 13-19 years and 66% in women aged 20-24 years to eight years after vaccination.

HPV 16 and 18 strains of Gardasil account for 70% of cervical, vaginal, vulvar and anus cervical cancers. Gardasil 9 also protects HPV 6 and 11, which cause 90% of genital warts and other strains (31, 33, 45, 52, and 58). Together, Gardasil 9 strains make up 90% of HPV-related cancers.

According to a new study, HPV infection caused by HPV 21, 33, and 45 was reduced by half (54%) among vaccinated girls aged 15 to 19 years. Similarly, the diagnosis of genital warts decreased by 67% for these girls and by 48% for boys of the same age. Older men (under 24 years old) and women (under 29 years of age) also suffered from reduction of genital warts by 31% -54%.

Levels of neoplasia of the 2nd degree cervical cancer precursor were also reduced twice (51%) among girls aged 15 to 19 and 31% among women aged 20 to 24 years.

For the development of cervical cancer it may take up to 20 years, so the vaccine, approved for the first time in 2006, was not available for a long time to be a very important factual basis, indicating a reduction in the incidence of cervical cancer. cancer incidence. However, a sharp decrease in the incidence of HPV infection should lead to a similar decrease in the frequency of HPV-induced cancer and immunity against the vaccine.

Several important reviews of the HPV vaccine have shown that this is one of the safest available vaccines. Although the stroke itself can be particularly painful, only side effects are regularly reported: pain, redness and pain in the place of others, and in some adolescents, temporary obscurity, common in many adolescents. Of the 13,000 people taking Gardasil 9 clinical trials, they also reported fever, vaccine allergy, asthma attack, headache and tonsillitis, although not all were identified vaccines.

The most effective way to reduce cervical cancer has been and remains regular screening. However, screening reveals only the early development of abnormal tissue that can become cancerous, while the HPV vaccine prevents viral infections that cause these tissue abnormalities.

Since there is currently no way to detect throat / mouth / neck or anal cancer in women or men (or human sexual penile cancer), the HPV vaccine remains the only way to prevent these cancers.

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In this archival snapshot, on August 28, 2006, the doctor is holding a human vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) in Gardasil at his Chicago office. (AP Photo / Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

POV YAZANA PRESS

Adults under the age of 45 years are advised to seek medical help for a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine that prevents – about one year in the United States. After confirmation from the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the recommendations also apply to the age of men aged 21 to 26 years, as well as to women.

The decision of the Advisory Committee of the CDC on Practice of Immunization (ACIP) on July 26 came that day Lancet Published the most current research on vaccine efficacy. Reductions were found in 31% to 83% of HPV infections and genital warts in men and women, depending on age and diagnosis.

HPV is responsible for almost all cervical cancers. Although HPV is mainly transmitted through sexual contact, it also occurs.

Previously, the HPV vaccine was introduced to women and men in a series of doses up to 14 years old or up to three doses. Men between the ages of 22 and 26 can also be vaccinated.

ACIP's unanimous vote on recommending 26 years for men shows the presence of a vaccine. In fact, studies show that males are more likely to develop an oral infection with high risk of HPV strain than women.

ACIP's 10 to 4 votes for adults aged 27 to 45 who have not received a vaccine against IDPs, insist on joint decision-making with their suppliers. The HPV vaccine is not approved by the FDA for adults over the age of 45 years, because efficacy data do not exist for this age group.

"ACIP's decision emphasizes that the HPV vaccine is safe and effective in patients between the ages of 27 and 45 and that the use of the vaccine in this age group should be the result of a joint decision between patients and their trusted patients," said the doctor in his statement. Christopher M. Zan, Vice President of Practical Work at the American College of Obstetricians-Gynecologists (ACOG).

"Gynecologists-obstetricians are invited to discuss with their patients from 27 to 45 years the potential benefits of HPV vaccination aimed at reducing the effectiveness of vaccination in the younger age group, as well as reducing the risk of a full-fledged disease and cervical cancer," said Zan, adding that Receiving a vaccine at the recommended age of 11-12 years is of greatest use.

Women's decisions will also take into account their personal circumstances, preferences and concerns, and the role of obstetrician-gynecologist is to provide impartial, balanced and comprehensive information to facilitate decision-making. He said.

New studies show a significant reduction in HPV-related infections

Researchers found that HPV infections in strains 16 and 18 fell by 83% in girls aged 13 to 19 years and by 66% in women aged 20-24 years, up to eight years after vaccination.

HPV 16 and 18 strains of Gardasil account for 70% of cervical, vaginal, vulvar and anus cervical cancers. Also protects against HPVs 6 and 11 that cause and against other strains (31, 33, 45, 52, and 58). Together, the Gardasil 9 strains are the same.

According to a new study, HPV infection caused by HPV 21, 33, and 45 was reduced by half (54%) among vaccinated girls aged 15 to 19 years. Similarly, the diagnosis of genital warts decreased by 67% for these girls and by 48% for boys of the same age. Older men (under 24 years old) and women (under 29 years of age) also suffered from reduction of genital warts by 31% -54%.

Levels of neoplasia of the 2nd degree cervical cancer precursor were also reduced twice (51%) among girls aged 15 to 19 and 31% among women aged 20 to 24 years.

The development of cervical cancer can last up to 20 years. Thus, the vaccine was not available for a long time to provide a sufficiently large database, indicating a reduction in cancer incidence. The drama, however, should lead to a similar decrease in the level of cancer caused by HPV, and.

Several HPV vaccines have been identified among available vaccines. Although the stroke itself can be particularly painful, only side effects are regularly reported: pain, redness and pain in the place of others, and in some adolescents, temporary obscurity, common in many adolescents. Of the 13,000 people taking Gardasil 9 clinical trials, they also reported fever, vaccine allergy, asthma attack, headache and tonsillitis, although not all were identified vaccines.

The most effective way to reduce cervical cancer has been and remains. However, screening reveals only the early development of abnormal tissue that can become cancerous, while the HPV vaccine prevents viral infections that cause these tissue abnormalities.

Since there is currently no way to detect throat / mouth / neck or anal cancer in women or men (or human sexual penile cancer), the HPV vaccine remains the only way to prevent these cancers.

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