Friday , June 18 2021

Finally, reliable Covid vaccines are SAFE when you are pregnant



Healthcare managers’ message is clear: Covid-19 vaccines are safe for pregnant women. Although the question mark has previously been tested on this vital detail, there is clear evidence today that there is no risk to expectant mothers or their unborn children.

This is a big step forward in the fight against the virus.

And there is even evidence that vaccinating women now can have significant benefits for any child they may have in the future. Because the immunity provided by the Kovid vaccine is passed on to the fetus, widespread absorption of the intervention will eventually lead to a generation of children with built-in resistance.

Although the risk that Kovid poses to pregnant women and infants is generally low, studies have shown that women who catch it during pregnancy are two to three times more likely to give birth prematurely – which can threaten the newborn. However, the blow greatly reduces this risk.

Despite this, experts say that about one in five pregnant patients is hesitant to receive an injection of Kovid. Other studies suggest that this is likely to be higher – a survey of more than 1,000 pregnant women reported last week showed that at least one in three was not sure they would have one.

Although Covid-19 was previously safe for pregnant women in interventional trials, there is clear evidence today that there is no risk to expectant mothers or their unborn children.

Although Covid-19 was previously safe for pregnant women in interventions, there is now clear evidence that there is no risk to expectant mothers or their unborn children.

“Most pregnant women understand this is important, but some say they’re not sure they want to take anything during pregnancy,” said Dr. Pat O’Brien, vice president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

However, scientists remain adamant. There is no evidence that any of the Covid vaccines have any effect on pregnancy.

One leading researcher told the newspaper that having a vaccine is “the best thing you can do for your baby” because it reduces the risk of premature birth. So why all the worries?

Some say the seeds of doubt were planted before the vaccination program began.

In November, Pfizer became the first company to announce the effectiveness of the Covid-19 vaccine, but the company also said it had not yet been tested on pregnant women.

This is perfectly normal for vaccine trials, says Dr. O’Brien, adding: “Traditionally, pregnant women are excluded from these studies as a precaution.”

Early animal studies of the vaccine also found no problems with pregnancy. However, due to the lack of data, the government warned future women not to have a fence – NHS leaflets distributed at the beginning of the issue once again confirmed this. The result, experts say, has been to heed concerns in a group that is naturally cautious about what medications they take.

Meanwhile, other countries have taken a different approach.

There is even evidence that vaccinating women now can have significant benefits for any child they may have in the future (photo file)

There is even evidence that vaccinating women now can have significant benefits for any children they may have in the future (photo file)

Israel, the world leader in vaccination, has gone so far as to prioritize the vaccine for pregnant women, while the United States decided to vaccinate in early December.

Those involved in the decision to delay in the UK support it.

Professor Adam Finn, a member of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization (JCVI), an advisory group that has led to the distribution of vaccines in the UK, says there are fears that approving any vaccine before clear evidence of safety emerges will delay pregnancy. women.

He says: “Everything we know about vaccines has indicated that these vaccines are safe for pregnant women, but that’s not enough to continue, you need data.

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“If we went out and said we thought these vaccines were safe, but expectant mothers should decide for themselves, I’m not sure it would go well. We had to come up with evidence that showed that vaccines are safe for mother and child. You can say that for this reason the American approach was a bit reckless, because they decided to move forward until the evidence came out. ‘

Instead, JCVI decided to wait until data from America leaked before making the call.

In early April, the data came in the form of a large study published by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He monitored the condition of more than 90,000 pregnant women who received the vaccine, most of them in the third trimester.

The CDC was able to report no security issues.

Since then, the number of American pregnant women vaccinated has risen to more than 105,000. However, more accurate data published in this study have raised new concerns.

The CDC closely monitored more than 800 participants. Of this group, 712 had live births, while 115 were pregnant.

This means that about one in eight women who received an injection lost a child.

The opinion is frightening, but in reality it is identical to the average rate of pregnancy loss among the population, according to the NHS.

Armed with this knowledge, on April 16, the JCVI recommended to the government that pregnant women, along with any pregnancy planning or breastfeeding, should be invited for vaccination along with their age and clinical risk group.

However, the recommendation only applied to Pfizer and Moderna inserts. This did not include the British Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine.

Confidence in AstraZeneca has declined in recent weeks in the UK, with reports that it can cause rare blood clots. Experts say that the decision not to give an pregnant woman an injection of AstraZeneca is not related to this. Instead, they say this is due to a lack of data on a specific strike.

“There’s nothing to assume that AstraZeneca will be dangerous for pregnant women,” says Professor Finn, “but without the data, we can’t make that call yet.”

Another concern is the concern that Covid vaccines may affect fertility.

According to the Office for National Statistics, young women are one of the most uncertain vaccine groups in the country, in part because of concerns about future pregnancies. But experts have realized that these concerns are unfounded.

Scientists remain steadfast.  There is no evidence that any of the Covid vaccines affect pregnancy (photo from file)

Scientists remain steadfast. There is no evidence that any of the Covid vaccines affect pregnancy (photo from file)

Dr O’Brien says: “There has been a major outbreak of infertility anxiety in recent months. It’s hard to see where it came from, as there is absolutely no evidence that these vaccines can affect fertility.”

Researchers note that there is no biologically plausible mechanism by which vaccines against Kovid or any other disease can cause infertility, and there has never been any evidence of infertility vaccines in the UK.

Although it is not entirely clear where the theory of infertility came from, several reports point to secret videos being posted on Facebook and YouTube.

Expecting that people under the age of 40 will begin receiving invitations to be vaccinated in the coming weeks, the government will soon find out the extent to which pregnant women, who are statistically more likely to fall into this age group, are willing to perform.

Despite early doubts, Dr. O’Brien is confident that the level of absorption will be high: “Women have been waiting for confidence. Now they have it.”


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